Walking Dead Podcast Episode 38: “This Sorrowful Life” with guest, Dan Heaton

Merle-WalkingDead

With only one Season 3 episode to go, Ricky, Kate and Simon are joined by SoS regular Dan Heaton for a typically heated discussion of “This Sorrowful Life,” penned by new showrunner Scott M. Gimple and directed by effects whiz Greg Nicotero. Discussed: trusting in showrunners, Rick’s decision-making skills, Andrew Lincoln vs. Norman Reedus, marriage, child-rearing, and the possible roads to be taken for Season 4.

Playlist:

Motorhead – “Fast and Loose.”

 

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By Ricky

Ricky D is the editor-in-chief of Sound on Sight and one of the hosts of the Sound On Sight podcast and the Sordid Cinema podcast. He is Sound On Sight's expert on Horror and contributes written reviews when time permits.

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12 Responses to Walking Dead Podcast Episode 38: “This Sorrowful Life” with guest, Dan Heaton

  1. sil March 27, 2013 at 12:38 pm

    i’m hoping rick gets somehow redeemd come next episode.. from the previews, i have a feeling theyre not even going to be at the prison when the governor and his thugs are there…im just hoping they dont go back for andrea

    Reply
    • Ricky March 27, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      I doubt they will focus on Rick. It will be all Michonne, Daryl, Andrea and The Governor.

      Reply
  2. Andreamustdie March 27, 2013 at 12:34 am

    Another great podcast episode. They should title this episode “The One Where Ricky Finally Lost It” LOL.

    Normally Ricky I take your side. But not this time my friend. I’m in agreement with Kate and Simon. This episode disappointed me. You guys have recently been discussing how the show seems like its stalling until the big event at the end. Well thats what the episode felt like to me. It was just stalling. The episode should have just went on with the big battle with the survivors and Woodbury. Instead we got more stalling. I like Michael Rooker the actor but I never like the Merle character. It was good riddance for me when he died.

    Also I had to roll my eyes. When Rick gave that cliche call to arms speech.

    Reply
    • Ricky March 27, 2013 at 1:12 am

      to each is own. I look at TV and Film in various ways. Story is something I’ve focused on, most of the season on the podcast, but there was too much to praise here , from effects to performances to humour to cinematography to direction and so on. I can’t spend every podcast rehashing my points from the previous week. We’ve already stated the season should have been 10 episodes many times. I needed to stay positive this week. Sorry.

      Reply
      • Andreamustdie March 27, 2013 at 1:42 am

        Ricky why are you apologizing for man? You need to stop trying to please everyone and stick to your guns when it comes to your criticism. The world needs smart effective criticism like you guys and gal are doing with the podcast. To keep shows like the Walking Dead honest.

        Reply
        • Ricky March 27, 2013 at 1:59 am

          I’m just saying that I need to balance my criticism with positive remarks. I don’t consider myself a critic. I just love the medium and as someone who has worked as an editor, cameraman, DOP, and also directed shorts, I look past the script. And especially as a fan of the horror genre, I find appreciation in many aspects of the show. Anyhow, I’m hoping for a really fun and longer than usual podcast next week.

          Reply
  3. Marcus March 26, 2013 at 2:16 am

    once again, i have to agree with kate. out of all the TWD podcast i’ve listened to, she’s the only one being brutally honest about the shows sloppy writing. seems like other podcasters lie about how they feel in order to get interviews from cast members.

    asking why she watches the show if she’s so critical over the bad writing is a question i’ve been asked several times as well. it’s not impossible to enjoy a show but still find tons of fault in it. we just want the show to live up to the comic and it’s full potential.

    i also agreed with her point on merle. if anyone knows how ruthless and calculating the governor is, it would be merle. so why take michonne to woodbury knowing he’ll kill them all is something i don’t understand. it’s sloppy, lazy writing to me. TWD suffers from LOST syndrome. they under develop a character until they’re ready to kill him off. imagine how much better the show would be if they kept t-dawg, the prisoners, lori alive until this confrontation.

    anyways, great podcast. once again, i enjoyed the debate.

    Reply
    • Ricky March 26, 2013 at 2:38 am

      I think no matter what I say each and every week, half of our listeners will complain. I’m either too negative or too positive, and clearly, I must speaking in some alien language because no one seems to listen to a word I say.

      I think we’ve all agreed – all season long – that the writing is sloppy. Go back and listen to the podcast, and you will hear me say three times that the problem with the show is the writing.

      I’m sorry, but when have I ever requested an interview with a cast member, that you assume I am lying?

      You may think this episode is bad. That is your opinion. I think this episode is terrific.

      It is amazing how each and every week, one of our best listeners finds a way to insult me, be it intentional or not.

      If I were concerned about giving negative reviews, don’t you think I would have stopped recording this podcast long ago?

      As far as Merle goes, feel free to read my review for my thoughts. I had more time to express myself in my review since the podcast was a bit rushed this week.

      http://www.soundonsight.org/the-walking-dead-ep-3-14-this-sorrowful-life/

      Finally:

      Funny you should compare The Walking Dead to LOST, considering Kate loves that show.

      Reply
      • Kate Kulzick March 26, 2013 at 6:37 am

        Ricky, I don’t think Marcus meant that he finds your reaction to this episode dishonest in any way. As we haven’t really sought out cast interviews, I’m assuming he’s referencing other sites/podcasts. Marcus, would you clear this up?

        (Oh, and I do think the LOST comparison is interesting- Marcus and I are in different places on that one.)

        Reply
      • Marcus March 26, 2013 at 6:42 am

        whoa, whoa, i’m referring to other TWD podcast networks, not yours! there’s quite a few TWD podcast that aren’t heavily critical because they want interviews from cast members. I thoroughly enjoy the debates you guys have, i agree with both of your points but she usually hits the nail on the head for me. i meant no disrespect by any means. i love this podcast and the passionate exchanges between the host.

        as for LOST, i can’t agree with kate on that one. it was the biggest con job of a show i’ve ever bared witness to. however, one thing i give them credit for is their ability to make flash backs interesting and relevant to the plot. unlike the latest TWD michonne/andrea flash back.

        thx for the response, hope i cleared things up.

        Reply
        • Ricky March 26, 2013 at 12:04 pm

          Thanks for clearing that up. I watched the first season of LOST – and my general reaction was that the writers knew how to develop characters, maybe better than other shows, but I always had the suspicion that they had no idea how they wanted to end the series. I stopped watching but all my friends who are fans all say that season six was a complete mess.

          I’ve said this many times on the show, but when an episode or series end strong, it helps me forgive some of the missteps along the way. That is the type of viewer I am.

          Scott M. Gimple wrote both Clear and this episode. Both episodes focused on trio of characters. In my opinion, both episodes were strong. What you are mistaking as bad writing, for me, seems like Gimple trying to do the best he can with the mess left on the table.

          I feel like we’ve all agreed about how poorly they are writing the characters. However, as a fan of the genre, I find enjoyments in other aspects of the show.

          TV is tricky especially with the Walking Dead.

          Reply
          • Ricky March 26, 2013 at 12:06 pm

            To answer your question / complaint about Merle… here is what I wrote in my review:

            When the Governor requests Michonne in exchange for peace, it not only becomes a true test of Rick’s character, but Merle as well. With “This Sorrowful Life,” The Walking Dead delivers another great bit of character redemption, by way of sacrifice. Merle gets a shot at redemption, and he runs with it, in his own erratic way. Can a leopard change its spots? All animals, including humans, are instinctual, and we may or may not be able to change that. If change means behaviour as a collection of habits, then people are definitely capable of change. But why the sudden turnaround for this Dixon brother? Truthfully, Merle hasn’t changed – he’ s just always had some bit of good inside him. Anyone thinking that Merle would actually deliver Michonne to The Governor is reading his entire character arc wrong. The tight bond between the Dixon brothers has long been established, and again reinforced here during his chat with Carol and later with Michonne. Carol suggests that he is a late bloomer, and Michonne later tries to persuade Merle to start over. But Merle knows who he is, and knows that life will be simpler for Darryl if he would just see his way out of his brother’s life. Perhaps Merle’s mission is motivated not so much by him seeking redemption as it is, just knowing his baby brother has found a new family and will be better off. Make no mistake about it, this was a suicide mission from the get-go. For a character who has been racist and sexist since the start, it was a nice touch on the part of the writer Scott M. Gimple (also responsible for penning the excellent episode “Clear”), to have Merle gain awareness from an African American woman. And how surprising is it, that Merle’s death is so utterly heartbreaking? Naturally, a good chunk of credit goes to actor Michael Rooker, but let us also take into account the reaction of Daryl. Norman Reedus is afforded a chance to show off his range as an actor when conveying Daryl’s absolute despair in the final moments. His finding Merle is reminiscent of the scene when Rick kills Shane, also in a penultimate episode, that of Season 2.

            Reply

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